Stories

Stories

Stories

I gave up my dreams of becoming an Architect

I gave up my dreams of becoming an Architect

I gave up my dreams of becoming an Architect

Jan 10, 2024

Career

Popular

How long have you been chasing your dreams? Mine hasn't been that long. As little as I was in 2005, I decided to become an architect. I made the decision and never looked back.

Another career was never even considered. Every step to becoming a licensed architect was calculated and scheduled for the result that has almost become my reality.

I have always looked at this as a gift.


I never needed to worry about my future. Not once did I doubt what I might do with my life. Secondary School courses were selected specific to the destination I saw at 10. I only chose one University because the plan was so certain and I did get in.


I know many architects with similar stories. It is not uncommon to ask an architect for his architecture story and have it begin with, “I always knew…”

I, myself, always knew I wanted to be an architect… but,

What if I was wrong?

What if my pre-puberty stage certainty led me down the wrong path? Is an architect what I am truly meant to be? Is this truly God’s plan for me?


For every architect I know with a childhood origin story, I know another who may be better off doing something else. Architecture is a difficult profession and not every one of us who has obtained our ultimate goal has found it to be the life of our dreams. Some of us would be more successful and in fact, happier, doing something else.

The time and effort to become a licensed architect makes this possibility unacceptable to many. The truth is buried under more than a decade of preparation, examination and execution. After so much dedication to one’s only dream, how could it be possible to give it up and start afresh?

Investing so much time being a Creator led me to explore ideas and concepts unrelated to architecture. I seek to discover alternative paths to success. I strive to learn what I may from entrepreneurs and creatives pursuing success in countless industries and professions. I read books, listened to podcasts and learned how successful entrepreneurs have found their true purpose in life. Many of these people have pursued multiple paths, “failing” over and over again prior to finding their true calling.

So, how do we know? How do we know if this path we have chosen is indeed the path that is meant to be? Maybe we should just quit architecture.

Maybe You Should Just Q.U.I.T.

... but before you quit, consider these four things to confirm your current condition and determine the proper path to your future.

1. Question


When we lock into our future so early in life, we tend to be single-minded in every decision we make. Take some time to look at your life and business with fresh eyes.

Are there better ways to do what you are doing? Do you actually need to be doing everything you are taking time to do? Can things be done better? Are you good at what you do? Are you happy?

Question everything.

2. Understand


Understand where you are, where you are going and where you have been.

How far have you come? Have you grown and improved your systems? What is your plan for the future? Do you clearly understand how to get there?

Study the lives of people you admire or look up to and review their journey, then summarise your current status for each lesson learned. Do you understand each fundamental element of a successful career path or entrepreneurial journey?

3. Income


Review your Profit and Loss Statement.

Are you earning enough income to be profitable and can sustain you when you eventually quit? Where does your income come from? When you eventually quit, which services will make you the most money? Which services will cost you more than they are making? How much do you need to earn each month in order to not regret quitting your dream but stifling job? How much more can you make? Are there other products/services/things you should be doing or offering?

Do you even have a budget?

4. Time


Time may be the most important step to consider.

How long have you been in business? Are you financially successful, or have you been struggling to stay in business from the day you began? Do you limp along, from project to project, expecting next month to be better? Has there ever been a time that you felt that everything was running smoothly and you were confident that you were on the right track?

How much more time do you need?

You may be passionate about your profession. You may be dedicated to your dreams. For me, architecture may be the perfect path to my purpose.

Could it be though, that maybe there is another path we should be pursuing? Maybe our true calling has yet to be discovered.

If you don’t stop and consider the possibility of quitting, you will never truly know that your path is, in fact, aligned with your purpose and that you are indeed meant to be an architect, an engineer, a doctor or some other type of dream profession.

Question:

Have you ever considered quitting your dream job/profession? How did you persevere?

Jan 10, 2024

Career

Popular

How long have you been chasing your dreams? Mine hasn't been that long. As little as I was in 2005, I decided to become an architect. I made the decision and never looked back.

Another career was never even considered. Every step to becoming a licensed architect was calculated and scheduled for the result that has almost become my reality.

I have always looked at this as a gift.


I never needed to worry about my future. Not once did I doubt what I might do with my life. Secondary School courses were selected specific to the destination I saw at 10. I only chose one University because the plan was so certain and I did get in.


I know many architects with similar stories. It is not uncommon to ask an architect for his architecture story and have it begin with, “I always knew…”

I, myself, always knew I wanted to be an architect… but,

What if I was wrong?

What if my pre-puberty stage certainty led me down the wrong path? Is an architect what I am truly meant to be? Is this truly God’s plan for me?


For every architect I know with a childhood origin story, I know another who may be better off doing something else. Architecture is a difficult profession and not every one of us who has obtained our ultimate goal has found it to be the life of our dreams. Some of us would be more successful and in fact, happier, doing something else.

The time and effort to become a licensed architect makes this possibility unacceptable to many. The truth is buried under more than a decade of preparation, examination and execution. After so much dedication to one’s only dream, how could it be possible to give it up and start afresh?

Investing so much time being a Creator led me to explore ideas and concepts unrelated to architecture. I seek to discover alternative paths to success. I strive to learn what I may from entrepreneurs and creatives pursuing success in countless industries and professions. I read books, listened to podcasts and learned how successful entrepreneurs have found their true purpose in life. Many of these people have pursued multiple paths, “failing” over and over again prior to finding their true calling.

So, how do we know? How do we know if this path we have chosen is indeed the path that is meant to be? Maybe we should just quit architecture.

Maybe You Should Just Q.U.I.T.

... but before you quit, consider these four things to confirm your current condition and determine the proper path to your future.

1. Question


When we lock into our future so early in life, we tend to be single-minded in every decision we make. Take some time to look at your life and business with fresh eyes.

Are there better ways to do what you are doing? Do you actually need to be doing everything you are taking time to do? Can things be done better? Are you good at what you do? Are you happy?

Question everything.

2. Understand


Understand where you are, where you are going and where you have been.

How far have you come? Have you grown and improved your systems? What is your plan for the future? Do you clearly understand how to get there?

Study the lives of people you admire or look up to and review their journey, then summarise your current status for each lesson learned. Do you understand each fundamental element of a successful career path or entrepreneurial journey?

3. Income


Review your Profit and Loss Statement.

Are you earning enough income to be profitable and can sustain you when you eventually quit? Where does your income come from? When you eventually quit, which services will make you the most money? Which services will cost you more than they are making? How much do you need to earn each month in order to not regret quitting your dream but stifling job? How much more can you make? Are there other products/services/things you should be doing or offering?

Do you even have a budget?

4. Time


Time may be the most important step to consider.

How long have you been in business? Are you financially successful, or have you been struggling to stay in business from the day you began? Do you limp along, from project to project, expecting next month to be better? Has there ever been a time that you felt that everything was running smoothly and you were confident that you were on the right track?

How much more time do you need?

You may be passionate about your profession. You may be dedicated to your dreams. For me, architecture may be the perfect path to my purpose.

Could it be though, that maybe there is another path we should be pursuing? Maybe our true calling has yet to be discovered.

If you don’t stop and consider the possibility of quitting, you will never truly know that your path is, in fact, aligned with your purpose and that you are indeed meant to be an architect, an engineer, a doctor or some other type of dream profession.

Question:

Have you ever considered quitting your dream job/profession? How did you persevere?

Jan 10, 2024

Career

Popular

How long have you been chasing your dreams? Mine hasn't been that long. As little as I was in 2005, I decided to become an architect. I made the decision and never looked back.

Another career was never even considered. Every step to becoming a licensed architect was calculated and scheduled for the result that has almost become my reality.

I have always looked at this as a gift.


I never needed to worry about my future. Not once did I doubt what I might do with my life. Secondary School courses were selected specific to the destination I saw at 10. I only chose one University because the plan was so certain and I did get in.


I know many architects with similar stories. It is not uncommon to ask an architect for his architecture story and have it begin with, “I always knew…”

I, myself, always knew I wanted to be an architect… but,

What if I was wrong?

What if my pre-puberty stage certainty led me down the wrong path? Is an architect what I am truly meant to be? Is this truly God’s plan for me?


For every architect I know with a childhood origin story, I know another who may be better off doing something else. Architecture is a difficult profession and not every one of us who has obtained our ultimate goal has found it to be the life of our dreams. Some of us would be more successful and in fact, happier, doing something else.

The time and effort to become a licensed architect makes this possibility unacceptable to many. The truth is buried under more than a decade of preparation, examination and execution. After so much dedication to one’s only dream, how could it be possible to give it up and start afresh?

Investing so much time being a Creator led me to explore ideas and concepts unrelated to architecture. I seek to discover alternative paths to success. I strive to learn what I may from entrepreneurs and creatives pursuing success in countless industries and professions. I read books, listened to podcasts and learned how successful entrepreneurs have found their true purpose in life. Many of these people have pursued multiple paths, “failing” over and over again prior to finding their true calling.

So, how do we know? How do we know if this path we have chosen is indeed the path that is meant to be? Maybe we should just quit architecture.

Maybe You Should Just Q.U.I.T.

... but before you quit, consider these four things to confirm your current condition and determine the proper path to your future.

1. Question


When we lock into our future so early in life, we tend to be single-minded in every decision we make. Take some time to look at your life and business with fresh eyes.

Are there better ways to do what you are doing? Do you actually need to be doing everything you are taking time to do? Can things be done better? Are you good at what you do? Are you happy?

Question everything.

2. Understand


Understand where you are, where you are going and where you have been.

How far have you come? Have you grown and improved your systems? What is your plan for the future? Do you clearly understand how to get there?

Study the lives of people you admire or look up to and review their journey, then summarise your current status for each lesson learned. Do you understand each fundamental element of a successful career path or entrepreneurial journey?

3. Income


Review your Profit and Loss Statement.

Are you earning enough income to be profitable and can sustain you when you eventually quit? Where does your income come from? When you eventually quit, which services will make you the most money? Which services will cost you more than they are making? How much do you need to earn each month in order to not regret quitting your dream but stifling job? How much more can you make? Are there other products/services/things you should be doing or offering?

Do you even have a budget?

4. Time


Time may be the most important step to consider.

How long have you been in business? Are you financially successful, or have you been struggling to stay in business from the day you began? Do you limp along, from project to project, expecting next month to be better? Has there ever been a time that you felt that everything was running smoothly and you were confident that you were on the right track?

How much more time do you need?

You may be passionate about your profession. You may be dedicated to your dreams. For me, architecture may be the perfect path to my purpose.

Could it be though, that maybe there is another path we should be pursuing? Maybe our true calling has yet to be discovered.

If you don’t stop and consider the possibility of quitting, you will never truly know that your path is, in fact, aligned with your purpose and that you are indeed meant to be an architect, an engineer, a doctor or some other type of dream profession.

Question:

Have you ever considered quitting your dream job/profession? How did you persevere?

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See my other expressions

Receive exclusive content and early-bird access to events and resources.

7.5k+ others subscribed

Get in touch

Send an email or DM and I'll get back to you asap.

All rights reserved © 2024 diimejii.com

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